Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 3, Introduction, part 6

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

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***   continuation from last week   ***

15.)

After the introduction to the Gita and summary of the same in the second chapter, we are taken to the chapter “Karma Yoga.” Irrespective of who the individual is and where he/she hails from, everybody on earth has to “Work.” To experience happiness we have to work and to overcome sorrow also we have to work.

“Karma Yoga” is the conduct of right actions that takes us back to experience the happiness that abides within. We are told that the happiness in not in the objects around us but our own perception of the same. The same object which is the source of pleasure for some is the source of sorrow for others.

The knife used in the kitchen to prepare the food, the knife used by a surgeon to operate on the sick, the knife used by a butcher in his profession is the source of happiness.

On the other hand the knife used to kill somebody or the knife that is taken as a tool to play can turn out to be source of sorrow. It is the bhavana / attitude towards the work and the object of work that makes all the difference.

Karma yoga is to teach the attitude to the work we undertake.
Ajnana is the lack of such knowledge in action.

Opposite to the sorrow is the state of happiness.

16.)

We will also be told in this chapter that even the happiness can turn out to be source of sorrow.

The happiness we experience from the world around us can be traced back also to ignorance. Happiness from around us has a time span fixed to it. After a while, the peak of happiness fades out and in some cases leads to sorrow also.

Longing for a child after marriage and getting a child out of wedlock brings in tremendous happiness. How long does it last? Birth of a child is not the beginning of eternal happiness but a mixture of happiness/sorrow as the child grows.

The day we change our bhavana and think in terms of duties towards the children our whole life changes.

If all our actions follow the code as given in the scriptures we find that our entire life is full of happiness without any room for sorrow to creep in. This state of happiness is “Ananda.” Karma yoga gives us an insight into our duties and warns us of the consequences of wrong actions.

**   will be continued   **

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 3, Introduction, part 3

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.TheGita.org/Downloads/News_07_46.pdf   @@@

***   continued from last week   ***

6.)

It is impossible to live without any actions. Our body/mind complex configuration makes it impossible to be free from actions. Likes and dislikes (raga/dwesha) propel one into actions. Human needs are for security and endless entertainment and both cannot be achieved without actions. The results of such actions bind us to further actions and it becomes an endless chain of events. The bondage we thus get trapped into is called “Samsara.”

7.)

Only positive, joyous, affirmative action’s conducted as an offering to the divine will liberate us from bondage. It is necessary for us to be involved in the work we do. After all each of us have duties to our own body, family and the society. Commitment to the work without attachment to the results of the work is the art of true karma yoga.

8.)

Man is in the transitional stage of evolution. He is in between the stages of animal and divine. Our duty is to evolve spiritually and move onwards to the next stag of evolution. Our actions will take us to divinity or let us fall down to lower levels of life. Karma yoga teaches the path to evolve spiritually.

9.)

It is important to note that man is a social animal. We have to live as part of the society and work for the society. From the time of birth till death we are the recipients of benefits in one form or other from the society. We take the same for granted or do not realise the same.

The Lord therefore tells us that it is our duty to offer joyfully the results of our actions to the society. But these actions should not be selfish motivated actions, He stresses. He makes it very clear that selfish actions are the root cause of destruction of the society. Karma yoga teaches us the way to overcome selfish motivated actions.

This chapter teaches us to do so by telling us “think before we act.”

**   will be continued   **

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 3, Introduction, part 1

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.TheGita.org/Downloads/News_07_44.pdf   @@@

We start with a new chapter today – and so let us start this with our prayer again.

OM SAHA NAVAVATU SAHA NAU BHUNAKTU
SAHA VEERYAM KARAVAVAHAI
TEJASWI NAVADHEETAMASTU
MAA VID VISHAVAHAI

May He protect us both (the teacher and the pupil)
May He cause us both to enjoy (the Supreme)
May we both exert together (to discover the true inner meaning of the scriptures)
May our studies be thorough and fruitful.
May we never misunderstand each other.

CHAPTER 3:   KARMA YOGA

There are so many different angles one can look into to understand “karma” and “Karma Yoga”. Herein I have tried briefly to go into some of the different ways to explain the same and hope this helps in understanding the slokas in the chapter.

1.)  The word “Karma” has a number of different meanings and in the context of this chapter we should take it as “action.”

“Yoga” means “Union”.
As the sacred text is about union with the Parabrahman, which is “Liberation”, we should consider “Karma Yoga” as the actions that assist the seeker towards “Liberation.”

The word “Karma” is pronounced with the emphasis on the letter “R” in it. For those who are not familiar with the Indian scripture, the pronunciation to include “r” might be difficult but not impossible. Making the “r” silent, what is said sounds like “kama” and gives a totally different meaning. “Kama” is “desire” and “karma is “action.”

Some of the other meanings of the word “karma”:
a)  Practice of religious duties.
b)  Destiny/fate.
c)  Moral duties.
d)  A ritual.
e)  Funeral rites (antya karma)

**   will be continued   **

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
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Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 3, Introduction, part 2

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.TheGita.org/Downloads/News_07_45.pdf   @@@

###   HAPPY DEEPAVALI   ###

***   continued from last week   ***

3.)

It is a fact of life that to get something we should be prepared to part with something else.

It is like paying money to buy the goods from the market. We cannot demand to get them free.

Without working we cannot get the wages and without wages we cannot buy what we want.

Taking this logic, “Moksha” does not come from “no action.” It needs input of efforts on our part. The individual who puts his efforts towards achieving it is known as “Sadhaka”, a spiritual seeker. Karma yoga gives the path for the sadhaka to attain moksha.

4.)

Yajna is dedicated action. To dedicate the results of actions with total faith and love towards the “Parabrahman” is the sure way to success for the seeker. Actions without faith and love do not get the desired result. Karma according to the instructions by the Lord really is to be considered as “Yajna.”

5.)

Karma yoga tells us what our duties are and teaches us the art of properly conducting the same. It tells us that our actions should not bring disruption or sorrow to any forms of life on this earth. This includes the members of the family and friends, members of the society and citizens in other parts of the world.

Using the intellectual capacity of reasoning, assisted and blessed by the “consciousness” within, conducting actions towards universal welfare is true “karma yoga.” This needs control over desire prompted thoughts/speech/actions at the level of mind/speech/body (Mano/vak/kaya). The Lord refers several times in this chapter to “Loka Kalyana” which means “universal welfare.”

**   will be continued   **

 

 

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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Bhagavad Gita – Summary chapter 2, part 5

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.TheGita.org/Downloads/News_07_42.pdf   @@@

Continuation from last week – text taken from the book “Tat Tvam Asi” by Dr. Nath. We continue with the negative results of an unsteady mind, and we end this summary with some good qualities and the end result to be achieved by contemplation. (Dasha)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Sloka 66

NAASTI BUDDHIR AYUKTASYA NA CHAYUKTASYA BHAVANA
NA CHABHAVAYATAHA SHANTIR ASHANTASYA KUTAHA SUKHAM

To the unsteady mind there is no knowledge of the Self. To the unsteady mind there is no meditation. To the unmeditative no peace and to the man without peace, how can there be happiness?

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

(If you want to read again the original comment on this sloka: it was in weeks 28 to 30 in 2007.)

Yoga as we have understood so far is union of the ego with the Atman. A Yogi is one who has attained such union; such a yogi is a yuktah. Ayuktah is that person who has not united the ego with the Atman. In other words, his senses and mind look for worldly pleasures. He is an egotistic person.

If we feel sorry for ourselves because someone criticises us, if we are looking for taking revenge on others, if we are jealous of others, can we find any peace in ourselves? If we are not peaceful, can we be happy? If we are not happy and peaceful, what is the use of having all the worldly pleasures? By becoming a millionaire one cannot find peace and happiness in himself. One cannot buy his way to attain liberation.

Peace and happiness are close associates of the person who has dropped his ego and merged his mind in the contemplation of the divine Atman.

Bhavana means contemplation. In spiritual terms it means “contemplation of Self-knowledge”. The main features of good bhavana (sadbhavana) are four:

Maitri   (friendship)
Karuna   (compassion)
Muditah   (happy and pleased)
Upeksha   (indifference)

Maitri:
Universal friendship is sadbhavana. Such a person looks upon all equally. He loves all. He does not say “my people, mine” etc. There is no room for dvesha (hatred) in such a person. He does not hate others.

Karuna:
Such a person has compassion for others who are in distress. He begs God to help people in distress.

Muditah:
Such a person has respect and praise for good actions. Any person who is performing good deeds that are for the welfare of the community is respected by the person with sadbhavana.

Upeksha:
This means indifference. The person with sadbhavana is indifferent to his critics. He continues to perform his duty as per the shastras. He has no thought of revenge on those who criticise and try to harm him.

To work without attachment and desires, without ego and vanity, ever steady in perfect equilibrium in success and failure, is, in other words, unconsciously “to assert the great truth” (the Self). The negation of the false and assertion of truth is the path to realise the Self.

This state of experience is called brahma-nirvanam. Nirvanam means “oneness”. Any experience concerning the physical world is possible at one´s mental and intellectual level of thinking. They are paroksa anubhuti (experiences of the physical world).

Brahmi experience is aparoksa anubhuti. It is not an experience one learns with the help of his indriyas (sense-organs) and hence it is above the level of the mind and intellect. It cannot be explained; but it is not impossible to attain. This attempt to experience the state that cannot be explained should be the goal for the spiritual seeker.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Sloka 72

YESHA BRAHMI STHITIHI PARTHA NAINAAM PRAPYA VIMUHYATI
STHITVA SYAAM ANTAKALEPI BRAHMA NIRVANAM RUCHATI

O Arjuna, having obtained this Brahmi state, man is not deluded. Being established in this even at the end of life, man attains oneness with Brahman.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

(original comment on this sloka, the last one in chapter 2, to be read from week 37)

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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Bhagavad Gita – Report on the 5. Gita Conference

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.TheGita.org/Downloads/News_07_43.pdf   (including some photos)   @@@

Report on the 5th International Gita Conference
“Faith and Global Peace”
August 18th and 19th, 2007, Durham, UK

Jaya Guru Datta.
Due to the Lords grace I was able to attend this conference, and at the break between the discussion of chapter 2 and 3 of the Gita in the Newsletter, I hope I can convey some of the vibrant energy of those two days to you – and I´d like to strongly recommend you to make an extra effort to join the 6th Gita Conference next year.
Dasha.

So before this one the International Gita Foundation Trust under the auspices of Dr. Nath already organized four annual conferences, all held in India. Now for the first time a location on another continent was chosen, and most likely next year will see the conference being held in New York. In the UK the conference was organized jointly by the Gita Trust and Kalapremi, an arts development organization, and I congratulate them both on the fine organization which created an inspiring and spiritually refreshing and uplifting atmosphere for all the attendants. My sincere thanks go to all the women and men involved who made this a big success for more than 300 people.

Now I can´t do justice to all the speakers in a short report, so I beg the pardon of those not mentioned hereafter – they all were most valuable to create the overall outcome. However let me single out some personal highlights. Whenever in the following there is a quote from a speaker, then it is taken from the Souvenir book released at the conference.

So the motto as stated on the front page of the Souvenir was:

“In all beings separated into different categories, that knowledge which sees the One inseparable reality, know that to be the pure knowledge.”
(Gita, Chapter 18, Verse 20)

This topic of Oneness in all religions was the central theme especially of the second day, where it was displayed on stage by representatives of a variety of churches and religions – in the morning we had speakers of acclaimed reputation, in the afternoon we had teenagers talking about the role of the youth towards Global Peace. And two things really made me happy:

(1) To hear and to see that they all were as sincere on their own path as they had a loving understanding for the different roads taken by the others to achieve the same goal uniting them all.

(2) To experience that for the Youth Forum in the afternoon the conference hall was even more crowded than ever before at the conference (the different parts could be booked separately).

Let me quote from the paper by Miss Lalita Kameswari from India, 19 years old and winner of the Gita competition the year before, invited to the conference by the Trust:

“Youth of our nation is experiencing today the need for an ideal which consistently motivates them for a self-sacrificing and dynamic action. It is natural for the youth to have the daring to plan, an irresistible urge and energy to work, the enthusiasm to conceive, …., an avalanche of power and strength, energy and vitality … but then how to train our mind in the very midst of confusing situations, how to juggle explosive conditions, threatening challenges and suffocative situations? This is what is exhaustively explained in Gita.”

In my humble opinion the conference really succeeded in taking up this very important point of transferring the ancient knowledge of the Gita to the young people today. And as this is what the future of all of us will be based upon, therefore I started my report with it and congratulate the organizers on their achievement.

But as the youth as well as we all need guidance, for the conference it was but natural to start with messages and blessings by the dignitaries:
H.H. Sri Ganapati Sachchidananda Swamiji
H.H. Sri Jagadguru Taralabalu Swamy
H.H. Sri Sukhabodhananda Swamy
H.H. Sri Japananada Swamy.

>From the talks please let me single out H.H. Sri Sukhabodhananda Swamy. He gave a scintillating speech on “Problems are inevitable – Suffering is optional” or put in another way: “Learn to have fun with a problem – that´s how to treat a problem wisely.” Thereby we may reach peace of mind and follow “the principal message of Bhagavad Gita being ‘Sama’ or ‘Equal’ to diverse emotions.” He demonstrated his approach very vividly throughout his talk by explaining the essence of the Gita on the fingers of just one hand: four fingers standing for the four ways of Yoga, then the forefinger bowing down to the thumb for the Mudra to represent life as whole and complete in every moment. Sri Sukhabodhananda was a great example himself that “to be spiritual” means “to heighten the spirit”.

Then in the evening we had another great example of this from Bhakti Bharati Pujya Shri Prema Pandurang and Party. She gave an equally scintillating “Musical Discourse” on Sri Krishna and the Gita – making all the audience forget that we had had a full day with about nine hours of talks already. It was as inspiring for the mind as it was a joy for the eyes, the ears and the heart. And it made us remember that the Gita is not a “text” but it is a beautiful poem and a “celestial song”.

So let me end with a quote from Dr. Nath:

“Wherever there is hatred let us sow the seed of love,
Wherever there is animosity, let us sow the seed of friendship,
Whenever we see ignorance, pain and sorrow, let us show compassion.”

With deeply felt gratitude for the conference and for the blessings of being able to attend it.
Dasha.

Links:
Conference Program:  www.kalapremi.org/doc/faith_conference_2007.pdf
The International Gita Foundation Trust:  www.gitainternational.org
Sri Sukhabodhananda Swamy:  www.swamisukhabodhananda.org
Bhakti Bharati Pujya Shri Prema Pandurang:  www.kshetropasna.com

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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Bhagavad Gita – Summary chapter 2, part 4

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.TheGita.org/Downloads/News_07_41.pdf   @@@

Continuation from last week – text taken from “Gems of Srimad Bhagavadgita” by Dr. Nath.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Sloka 62

DHYAYATO VISHAYAN PUMSAHA SANGASTESHOOPAJAYATE
SANGAT SANJAYATE KAMAHA KAMAT KRODHOBHIJAYATE

Brooding on the objects of the senses, man develops attachment to them; from attachment comes desire; from desire anger sprouts forth.

Sloka 63

KRODAD BHAVATI SAMMOHAHA SAMMOHAT AMRITI VIBHRAMAHA
SMRITI BRAMSAD BUDDHI NASH BUDDHI NASHAT PRANASHYATI

>From anger proceeds delusion; from delusion, confused memory; from confused memory the ruin of the reason; due to the ruin of reason, he perishes.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

(If you want to read again the original comment on these slokas alone: it was in weeks 21 and 22 in 2007.)

These slokas are part of slokas 55 – 72 where the Lord describes the qualities of a “Sthithaprajna”: man of steady wisdom.

The path of destruction of any individual who goes after sensual desires is graphically described in these two slokas. When we go after objects of desires, many a times we end up by getting angry for a variety of reasons.

What happens to the person who gets angry is described in sloka 63. Anger acts like alcohol in a man. There is a surge of chemical adrenaline in the body. The individual loses control over his bodily actions and trembles all over. His eyes become blood shot and the speech becomes incoherent. His breathing becomes erratic and rapid.

As a consequence there is physiologically accumulation of carbon dioxide that dulls the brain. His intellect loses the power of discrimination and he indulges in abuse and violence without his knowledge. Like being possessed of evil spirit, forgetting his status and position, he almost acts like an animal. This state of mind is “Sammoha” (delusion). A deluded individual does not remember the person he is dealing with.

This state of momentary loss of memory is “smritivibhrama.”

As soon as a person loses his memory, one can say that the person perishes (pranashyati.)

It therefore goes without saying that to avoid such calamity we should learn the art of controlling the sensual desires that crop up in our mind.

***   will be continued   ***

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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Bhagavad Gita – Summary chapter 2, part 1

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.TheGita.org/Downloads/News_07_38.pdf   @@@

Message from the organizer.

Dear friends.

Can anyone recall when we started with chapter two, the longest one in the entire Gita? It was February last year – 84 weeks ago. Can everyone recall all we learnt in these weeks? So I hope you will agree that it´s not loosing time to embark on a little summary before going on to the next chapter.

To start with, and with his kind consent, I take the text from the booklet “Gems of Srimad Bhagavadgita” by Dr. Nath. As the title says, this one quotes just a few of the major slokas from the Gita and comments on the most valuable aspects. So I hope you will enjoy some extracts from this.

—————————————————————–

Chapter 2 – SAMKHYA YOGA

This chaper is considered to be the summary of the entire Gita.

Samkhya is one of the six Hindu schools of philosophy. Swami Chinmayananda says that Samkhya denotes “the logic of thought in a philosophy.”

The word samkhya can be divided into:
Sam – meaning “Union”, and
Khya – meaning “Knowledge.”

Samkhya therefore can be considered as “union with the Knowledge.” In this instance it is the total knowledge about the “Atman and Paramatma,” which is all about the “Eternal Truth.”

The main purpose of the Gita is to give mankind the lessons on the philosophy of living.

Arjuna was made to analyse his feelings and act according to the commands of the sastras. If all of us act according to our inner conscience, (provided we have received the basic education on the scriptures) we can make this world a better place to live.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Sloka 3

KLAIBYAM MAA SMA GAMAHA PARTHA NAITAT TVAYI UPAPADYATE
KSHUDRAM HRIDAYA DAURBALYAM TYAKTVOTTISHTA PARANTAPA

O Partha, do not yield to this wretchedness. It does not befit you. Cast off this wretched weakness of the heart. Arise, O scorcher of the enemies.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

This is a very famous sloka in the Gita and is considered as a very strong mantra for the mankind. Whenever there is a philosophical subject under discussion, many a scholars quote this verse. Swamy Vivekananda considers this sloka to be the entire summary of the Gita philosophy. He picks up two words in this sloka as the best words used by Krishna. They are:

Klaibyam – wretchedness,
Utthishta – arise.

The lesson to mankind: In states of distress, do not succumb to this weakness which makes one lose capacity to conduct the duties. Stand up and carry on the ordained duties in which one has received the basic training.

The Gita is basically meant to give one strength to overcome the state of momentary grief which everyone of us experience sometime or other in out lives. Grief is nothing but a state of “weakness of the mind.”

***   will be continued   ***

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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Bhagavad Gita – Summary chapter 2, part 3

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.TheGita.org/Downloads/News_07_40.pdf   @@@

Continuation from last week – text taken from “Gems of Srimad Bhagavadgita” by Dr. Nath (arrangement by Dasha)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Sloka 47

KARAMANYAVADHIKARASTHE MAA PHALESHU KADACHANA
MAA KARMA PHALA HETUR BHURMA TE SANAGOSTVAKARMANI

You have the right to work only
but never to its fruits.
Let not the fruits of action be your motive.
Nor let your attachment be to inaction.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

(If you want to read again the original comment on this sloka alone: it was in weeks 50 and 51 in 2006 plus week 1 in 2007.)

This sloka is to be considered as a command.

Also in this sloka, “Karma” has to be read as “Duty” and Adhikara as “Right”.

Each one of us has a selected space and a specific role in the society. We are selected by the Lord to the position we hold in the society. We have to fulfil the rules and regulations pertaining to our role. It involves both social duties and spiritual duties and the results will come automatically.

“Work” is defined as an effort directed towards a goal. It can also mean: study; employment; toil; manual labour; occupation.

Working towards a goal needs effort. The greater the benefits required from actions, the greater has to be the sacrifice of personal pleasures and the effort to put in.

No one can escape work. Even to survive we conduct voluntary or involuntary actions every second of our life.

Our breathing is involuntary but by controlling it we can maintain better mental and physical health.

The day we learn the art of controlling our involuntary actions and involuntarily conduct all other voluntary duties (surrendering fruits of action) we would have learnt the essence of the sacred text.

Having been born as humans…

… we have adhikara (right) to work and using the capacity of discrimination, we must discharge all duties;

… we must know how to discharge our duties following the path of righteousness;

… while conducting the work, we must concentrate on the work;

… we have a duty to maintain our body, duty towards our family and towards the community of which we are part

… we should not conduct actions only for selfish gains and pleasures;

… we have no right to the fruits of action.

When it says “no right to the fruit of action” it means that there should be reasonable share to all the sections of the community / all parts of the universe from the results from ons’s actions. When one says “offer the result to God”, it really means to the God within and God all around. Satvic / pure outlook in life will help us to work as servants of God and be His medium to discharge our duties.

Escaping from work is contrary to the sastras. The lord ends with an apt warning: “nor let your attachment be to inaction.”

If everyone stops working the world cannot survive. We all have to fulfil our roles as members of the society at large. Each one of us should put in our efforts towards the welfare of the world and then only there is room for peace and prosperity in that society. Let us not be lazy and escape the work.

***   will be continued   ***

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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Bhagavad Gita – Summary chapter 2, part 2

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.TheGita.org/Downloads/News_07_39.pdf   @@@

Continuation from last week – text taken from “Gems of Srimad Bhagavadgita” by Dr. Nath.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Sloka 38

sukha dukhe same’ kritva labha labhou jaya jayou
tatho yuddhaya yujyasva naivam papam avapsyasi

Having an equal mind in happiness-sorrow; gain-loss; victory-defeat; engage in battle and thereby you will not incur sin.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

(If you want to read again the original comment on this sloka alone: it was in week 40 in 2006.)

Whether we like it or not, wish it or not, we are in this world and to be part of it must discharge our duties. It is our “Karma”.

This sloka gives us the secret of Karma Yoga.

The Lord has given us three types of reaction to the end result of our actions. It could be as an individual, part of a family or member of the society.

On the physical plane we say “Victory or Defeat.”

On the mental plane we say “Gain or Loss.”

On the intellectual plane we say “Pains and Pleasures.”

It is not the work that binds us to this world but it is the results that bind us. Krishna brings out this significant advice several times in the Gita.

We have to analyse the possible results of any actions we undertake. We are hurt and in distress if the results are contrary to our expectations. We feel satisfied/happy if the results go according to our expectations. We must avoid certain actions or modify them so that we do not have to experience the pain. After analysing this way we should conduct the work. But once we start the work, we should not waste any time in thinking about the outcome. The results will come automatically depending upon the actions.

Later on we will find that results of some actions conducted in the past (including past births) may influence the outcome of the present action.

Developing a balance of mind, concentrating on the work to be done will bring us “Peace.” The state of “Peace” experienced will be far superior to any of the other feelings the individual may experience. The work has to become “worship” and God gives us the “Peace.”

***   summary will be continued   ***

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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