Introductory Podcast


Namaste and Welcome All of you for this new Podcast on Srimad Bhagavad Gita.

International Gita Foundation Trust was founded in 2003.
With the primary objective of promoting the sacred universal philosophy of the Srimad Bhagavad Gita.
We conduct Annual Gita Conferences across the world. Where in savants, saints, sadhus, philosophers, youth have taken part. We like to involve the youth from different religious backgrounds and let them express their views.
The reason for publishing this podcast series is to present the sacred text in a format that is easy to understand for the different age groups, and develop an interest to listen, incorporate it in our daily life and experience the peace. The podcast series is available for your convenience and we will publish them at regular intervals. These recordings will be made available on CDs as well.
Om Shantihi Shantihi Shantihi

Introduction.

Let us take up few simple questions.

What is Gita?
What is Bhagawadgita?
Who composed it?
Who is Veda Vyasa?
Are there any other Gitas?
When did the Gita take birth?

Gita means “a song” and generally it refers to the Srimad Bhagawadgita.
Bhagawadgita is the song that came from the lips of Bhagawaan Sri Krishna.
In the entire Gita consists of 701 verses, sage poet Veda Vyasa, addresses Sri Krishna as “Bhagawan”. He says “Bhagawaan Uvacha” (said by Bhagawaan) and does not say Krishna said.
“Bhaga” means “Glory”.
The glory of Lord Vishnu is expressed in pictorial form with Vishnu having “Six Glories”.
They are:
The conche (shanku)
The wheel
The mace
The lotus
The Crown
The Glow behind (Tejas).

The blowing from the conche (shanku) is to announce His arrival whenever there is upsurge of unrighteousness.
The wheel represents “Wheel of time”. As “Time” I will annihilate anyone at any time I decide to, is its meaning.
The mace warns that He will crush the ego,
The Lotus depicts, “Non attachment.”
The crown represents that He is the emperor of the entire universe.
The Glow is the spiritual glow as he is the Vedas itself.

Hence, the sacred text is known as Srimad Bhagawadgita.”
Srimad Bhagawadgita is considered to be the most sacred philosophical text for Hindus all over the world. As a matter of fact, one can consider that it is for humanity in general and not particularly only for the Hindus. This is so because its aim is “Universal Welfare, Peace and Harmony” not just for the present but for the entire period of life on this universe.

It is the celestial song by Lord Krishna to the mankind through the medium of Arjuna
The Gita is an approved and tested tool by the masters whose only wish was “Universal Welfare.” It the tool for uplifting the individual spiritually and destroying the ego.
It is a navigational tool that helps one to negotiate the obstacles in the spiritual journey in quest of “The Eternal Bliss.”

It is for reorganisation of the minds and brings about “Renaissance.”
It is for reorganisation of lives and brings about “Transformation.”
It is Moksha Sastra for rare few who look for “Moksha.”(Liberation)
It is Dharma Sastra for those who want to lead the life of “Righteousness.”
It is Jnana sastra for those who want have the knowledge of the Purusha and Prakriti.
It is Jnana bhandara as it is never ending store house of knowledge and is available to all.
For majority, it is Jivana Sastra/karma sastra (art of living) for those who want to have a life with minimal pains and sorrows and experience as much happiness as possible.

It is considered to be the summary of 108 Upanisads. The Upanisads in turn are the summary of the Four Vedas. The Vedas are the “Revealed Sacred Texts” of the Hindus and are the most ancient texts on philosophy.
To understand the true meaning incorporated in the sacred text, it is preferable for the reader to have the knowledge of the epic “Mahabharata.” Understanding the story of Mahabharata helps greatly to follow the Gita.
There is a saying: The Gita is summary of the qualities of the various characters encountered in the Mahabharata.”
Mahabharata can be considered as personification of the qualities enumerated in the Gita.”
It consists of 701 slokas divided into 18 chapters. Each chapter has a title and is considered as a Yoga which is a means to unite with Brahman.

Lets go back 3200 BC

Sanjaya, the trusted minister of the blind king Dhritarashtra was bestowed with divine vision by Sage poet Sadguru Veda Vyasa so that he could narrate the events on the battlefield between the Pandavas and the Kauravas.
Sanjaya narrates verbatim the entire Gita as a dialogue between Sri Krishna and Arjuna. It is in Sanskrit language, the most ancient language of the Hindus.

Hari Om Tatsat Sri Krishnarpanamasthu 


 

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK. 

Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“. 
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Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 3, Sloka 5, part 3

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

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@@@   full text on sloka 5
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Sloka 5:

NA HI KASHCHIT KSHANAMAPI JATU TISHTATI AKARMA KRIT
KARYATE HY AVASHAHA KARMA SARVAHA PRAKRITIJAIR GUNAIH.

No one can ever remain, even for a moment, without performing work. Everyone, without his will, is made to do work by the qualities born of prakriti.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

***   continuation from last week   ***

The Lord is particularly referring to Arjuna in this instance. Arjuna had taken shelter under Krishna at the beginning of this war. He was confused. He was born as Kshatriya and had a duty to fight and protect but wanted to escape from his duties and give away the kingdom to Duryodhana who was a personification of “unrighteousness.”

If he had absconded from his duties and went away to the forest, his thought imprints would not have changed overnight. He would still carry the gunas of a kshatriya and his association with life in the forest would have made him conduct actions sooner or later that befit his qualities.

This is the summary of this verse. By stopping here, one may get a wrong notion that if it is so, that the nature determines all our actions, there is no room for change. We are what we are and we can do what our thought imprints dictate. This is the wrong notion. The human birth is associated with having the “Intellect”, the reasoning capacity. There is room for the better in the form of influence by the parents and the society in the early part of one’s life. The education provided by the society is supposed to assist the individual in modifying his actions for the benefit of the society. In Hindu philosophy and tradition prominent role is given to the “Guru”, a learned master of the scriptures. His role is to impart the scriptural knowledge into the seeker and assist him in the path of spiritual progress.

These are voluntary actions. Let us understand this clearly. Yes, it is true that the gunas we are born with dictate the type of work we conduct. At the same time, we have an opportunity to change the thought imprints in our mind. This is a slow process and by what we call as “Practice” (Abhyasa) it is possible to change. Starting from the time of birth into this world, there is a latent period before the baby can become a child and then an adult. During this early period of one’s life, the immediate family (mother, father etc) and the society outside the family has an opportunity to bring in a change in the quality of thoughts. It is a slow process but not an impossible task.

The Puranas tell us the story of Prahlada to highlight this point. He was born in a demonic family as the son of the demon Hiranyakashipu. Destiny made his mother, while he was still in the mother’s womb, to reside in the abode of sage Narada. She was given discourses on the Lord Vishnu, the Supreme. This changed Prahlada’s thought imprints while he was still in mother’s womb from a demonical one to a saintly nature.

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

Find out more at www.GitaGlobal.com
Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/GitaGlobal or
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Posted via email from International Gita Foundation Trust

Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 3, Sloka 6, part 1

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.TheGita.org/Downloads/News_08_10.pdf   @@@

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Sloka 6:

KARMENDRIYANI SAMYAMYA YA AASTE’ MANASAA SMARAN
INDRIYARTHAAN VIMOODATMAA MITHYACHARAHA ITI UCHYATE.

He who, restraining the organs of action, sits contemplating on the sense objects with mind is called a hypocrite.

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The Lord is referring to two instruments of knowledge: the sense organs and the mind. Eyes, ears, nose, tongue and the skin are the five sense organs. Their duty is to provide the mind with the details of the objects around.

The mind is to be looked upon as the superior officer to the sense organs. Its role is to analyse the impulses received from the sense organs and act accordingly. It acts also as the storehouse of the feelings experienced from the impulses received. In other words, it is also a memory bank that keeps a database of all past experiences. It is the most powerful computer and can carry out a number of skilful tasks.

We can broadly classify the experiences as those that are pleasurable and that are painful and filled with sorrow. The life is a mixture of experiences of both the types. Really speaking our life is a journey towards the abode of the “Supreme” and we say it is the “Spiritual Journey.”

The society in general is an admixture of different groups of people. Some are sincere seekers, some indifferent and some who are antisocial.

There is still another class of people who pretend to be the seekers of Truth. They make a pretence of sitting in a posture of meditation to draw the public attention. They follow the external rituals of meditation keeping their eyes shut and pretend to be contemplating on the Supreme. But their minds are filled with recollecting the happy experiences of past or contemplating on the future happy experiences they would like to go through.

This is only a pretence and the Lord uses the word “Hypocrites” to describe them.

***   will be continued   ***

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

Find out more at www.GitaGlobal.com
Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/GitaGlobal or
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Posted via email from International Gita Foundation Trust

Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 3, Sloka 5, part 1

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.TheGita.org/Downloads/News_08_07.pdf   @@@

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Sloka 5:

NA HI KASHCHIT KSHANAMAPI JATU TISHTATI AKARMA KRIT
KARYATE HY AVASHAHA KARMA SARVAHA PRAKRITIJAIR GUNAIH.

No one can ever remain, even for a moment, without performing work. Everyone, without his will, is made to do work by the qualities born of prakriti.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

It is not so difficult to understand the first half of the verse. We all know that there are basically two types of actions:
Voluntary
Involuntary.

>From the point of view of our own physical body, we conduct a number of involuntary actions. It is as though we do not know them but we carry on doing those actions according to a time clock set in our brain.

Act of breathing, circulation, digestion are some of the examples of involuntary actions we conduct. By nature, for the sole purpose of survival, we conduct these involuntary actions. Failure to breathe, failure of circulatory system end up with catastrophic consequences. Digestion is almost a continuous process within our body. We survive because of these involuntary actions.

The act of blinking is another example of involuntary action. It is to protect our eye, a delicate organ and an essential one for survival in this world. By nature, to protect the eyes, we conduct the act of blinking.

The second half of the verse is a little bit difficult to understand. The Lord says that everyone, without his will is made to work by the qualities born of prakriti. This refers to both voluntary and involuntary actions. We have looked at some examples of involuntary actions at the beginning of this verse. Let us look at some of the voluntary actions.

What we are and what we do voluntarily also to a large extent depends upon what we call as “thought imprints” called as “Vasanas”. These are stored in the mind and are the precursors of all our actions. The hindu philosophy is based on the theory of rebirth after the physical death. We have no control over where we are born next, what form we take and when after death we are born again. The present life is considered to be one of several births and deaths in our life. The life is a sojourn of innumerable births and deaths that ultimately leads one to “Liberation.” We had many births before and will have many more births to come. Depending on the purity of thoughts and actions we either climb upwards towards the path of attaining final Liberation or fall down into the world of lower forms of birth.

***   will be continued   ***

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

Find out more at www.GitaGlobal.com
Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/GitaGlobal or
Follow us on Posterous: http://gitaglobal.posterous.com

Posted via email from International Gita Foundation Trust

Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 3, Sloka 5, part 2

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.TheGita.org/Downloads/News_08_08.pdf   @@@

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Sloka 5:

NA HI KASHCHIT KSHANAMAPI JATU TISHTATI AKARMA KRIT
KARYATE HY AVASHAHA KARMA SARVAHA PRAKRITIJAIR GUNAIH.

No one can ever remain, even for a moment, without performing work. Everyone, without his will, is made to do work by the qualities born of prakriti.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

***   continuation from last week   ***

Based on this theory of rebirth after the physical death, is the aspect of “Gunas.” The gunas are the thought imprints from the previous births stored in the mind at the time of the new birth into this world. The birth as human is to exhaust the stored vasana imprints and not to instil any new vasanas. This is a rarity and only rare souls manage to achieve this state of “no stored vasanas in the mind” and attain the final liberation.

“Prakriti” is nature. The word “nature” refers to one’s own nature and also refers to the five gross elements: “earth, water, fire, air and space.” Here, the word refers to our own nature.

The gunas are classified broadly into “Pure, Passionate and Indolent.” (Satvas, Rajas and Tamas.)

The Hindu philosophy classifies the entire population on the basis of these three qualities into the four following categories:
Brahmana
Kshatriya
Vaishya
Shoodra.

Brahmana shows predominance of pure thoughts and is recognised by his knowledge of the Self, the scriptures and the like. He is considered to be an evolved soul.

Kshatriya with combination of Pure and Passionate qualities, the pure predominating, is physically strong and conducts duties to protect the innocent and those under his shelter. The warrior class of people of the old ages belonged to this class. Arjuna belonged to this group.

Vaishya also with predominance of pure and passionate qualities, a touch of tamasic quality, but with passionate predominating. They conduct actions for personal gains. Business class of people belong to this group.

Shoodra, with a mixture of rajasic and tamasic qualities, tamas predominating. They are not as clever as the other three class of people as such but physically strong and conduct duties pertaining to the menial tasks and work needing predominantly physical strength.

Each one of us is born into this world with a bundle of thought imprints that dictate the type of actions we conduct later on in our lives.

***   will be continued   ***

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

Find out more at www.GitaGlobal.com
Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/GitaGlobal or
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Posted via email from International Gita Foundation Trust

Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 3, Sloka 4, part 2

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.TheGita.org/Downloads/News_08_06.pdf   @@@

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Sloka 4:

NA KARMANAM ANARAMBHAM NAISHKARMYAM PURUSHO’SNUTE
NA CHA SANYASAD EVA SIDDHIM SAMADHIGACHATI

Man does not reach the actionless state of Brahman by non-performance of actions.
Man also does not attain “perfection” by renunciation only.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

***   continued from last week   ***

In spiritual evolution we have to climb from being:
Stone man
To
Animal man
To
Man man
To
God man.

The final aim is to achieve “Liberation.”

The higher we climb the spiritual ladder, more responsibility is on us to conduct actions for the welfare of the universe.

Let us remember the verse 47, chapter 2:
Karmanye vaadhikarasthe–.
Clearing the thought imprints needs conducting actions in the spirit of “offering the results of good actions to the Lord” and conducting actions “without any motive for selfish gains.”

Na karmanaam arambha:
This is the first quarter of the verse.
“Arambha” is beginning.
“Na karmanaam” means “not conducting actions.”
There is always a beginning and end to any work conducted.
There is no such thing as “not conducting actions.” The thought imprints on our mind which we carry as a result of past actions is the beginning for all actions. Sooner or later we have to work to burn all the stored vasanas.

Our philosophy tells us that we have all come from “Parabrahman” and we have to finally go back to Him.

The first day we came out into this world, not of this birth, but of the first ever birth into this world (of which we have no notion at all), we started to conduct actions. As we accumulate more and more vasanas due to desires and hatreds in the births we undertake, we have to:
–  Purify our minds of all past thoughts
–  To obtain jnana and finally
–  To attain Moksha.

Actions performed with this principle are true karma. Such actions then become “Yajna.” Yajna is “dedicated action.”

The Vedas prescribe various duties to perform by the members of any one given community to suit the temperament of the individuals. We are part of the community we live in. We have to live in harmony with others. To keep the communities together each member of that community has to take up some form of work. No one in the community has a right not to work.

By asserting that “by not working one does not get Liberated”, Sri Krishna is giving us the motivation to work for the community.

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

Find out more at www.GitaGlobal.com
Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/GitaGlobal or
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Posted via email from International Gita Foundation Trust

Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 3, Sloka 4, part 1

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.TheGita.org/Downloads/News_08_05.pdf   @@@

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Sloka 4:

NA KARMANAM ANARAMBHAM NAISHKARMYAM PURUSHO’SNUTE
NA CHA SANYASAD EVA SIDDHIM SAMADHIGACHATI

Man does not reach the actionless state of Brahman by non-performance of actions.
Man also does not attain “perfection” by renunciation only.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Let us analyse the first half of the verse:

“Man does not reach the actionless state of Parabrahman by non-performance of actions.”

Many have a wrong notion that as sin can only result from the actions performed, it is best to avoid actions altogether.
They also have a wrong notion that “Brahman is actionless.”
If I achieve “Liberation” I do not need to conduct any more actions, they assume.

We are told that all these assumptions are wrong. Why?

Each one of us is on this earth commissioned to live through and exhaust the fruits of our actions conducted in the past and continuing to conduct at present. To exhaust all the stored vasanas (vasana kshaya) and achieve the destruction of the so called mind of ours, (Manonasha) we have no choice but to work. Only on achieving the two conditions successfully, i.e.: “vasana kashaya and mano nasha,” we can realise the state of “Parabrahman”.

Even then, to consider that “Parabrahman is actionless” is also a wrong notion.
Parabrahman is constantly at work for the maintenance of the universe He created.

The second half of the verse:

“Man also does not attain perfection by renunciation.”

A child gets perfection in walking after several attempts to crawl, to stand up and start learning to walk the first few steps.
One attains perfection in cookery after the first few failed attempts.
We have to live in this world, conduct ordained actions and learn from our mistakes.

Later on we will come to know this as “Jnana and Vijnana”. Knowledge by itself cannot make the individual perfect. Actions conducted with the knowledge, learning from the mistakes are necessary to attain perfection. We will be told later on in chapter 7 that one in a million tries to achieve perfection and a rare few among those who try will actually succeed in achieving perfection.

Graduation does not give the tile of “Professor and Head of the Department.” The graduate has to pass through a number of stages of promotion from lecturer to Professor.

Thinking that we know all about “actions and results, both good and bad; happiness, sorrow” and decide to renounce all actions is a foolish assumption.

In continuation of the theme taken up in the previous verse, Sri Krishna is therefore stressing on the need to conduct actions.

***   will be continued   ***

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

Find out more at www.GitaGlobal.com
Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/GitaGlobal or
Follow us on Posterous: http://gitaglobal.posterous.com

Posted via email from International Gita Foundation Trust

Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 3, Sloka 3, part 3

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.TheGita.org/Downloads/News_08_04.pdf   @@@
@@@   full text for sloka 3

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Sloka 3

Sri Bhagawan uvacha:
Sri Bhagawan spoke thus:

LOKE’SMIN DVIVIDHA NISHTA PURA PROKTA MAYANGHA
JNANA YOG’ENA SANKHYANAAM KARMA YOG’ENA YOGINAAM.

In this world there is a two-fold path, O sinless Arjuna, the path of knowledge of the Sankhyans and the path of action of the Yogins.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

***   continuation from last week   ***

The Vedas are classified into three sections:
Karma kanda
Jnana kanda
Upasana kanda.

The three are the steps that lead to the final act of “Realisation of Parabrahman.”

The Brahmin and Kshatriya children went to the guru kula ashrama to study the Vedas.

One group left after studying the first section and returned to take up their duties in the society. These are “Kshatriyas.”

Second group stayed a bit longer, received the knowledge of the Atman and returned to the society to take up the role of promoting the religious preaching. These are the “Brahmanas”.

The last group did not return to the society but got totally immersed in the task of experiencing the “Eternal Peace.”

Somewhere in the middle of evolution, the division between the path of action and the path of knowledge got separated and remained in the minds of many as separate entities.

Sri Krishna is re-iterating the fact that the division is not correct and both are the sadhana paths for spiritual seekers. He has blessed us with the present of the sacred text, “Srimad Bhagavad-Gita.”

Renunciation is not the path for majority. Karma yogis are grihastas (Householders) and follow the “Grihasta ashrama dharma” (household duties).

Let us understand the Gita in this sense. We have a choice to follow the path that suits our temperament and not bicker about which path is best. Try to become sadhakas, work for spiritual wealth, (sadhana) and attain Moksha.

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

Find out more at www.GitaGlobal.com
Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/GitaGlobal or
Follow us on Posterous: http://gitaglobal.posterous.com

Posted via email from International Gita Foundation Trust

Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 3, Sloka 3, part 2

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.TheGita.org/Downloads/News_08_03.pdf   @@@

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Sloka 3

Sri Bhagawan uvacha:
Sri Bhagawan spoke thus:

LOKE’SMIN DVIVIDHA NISHTA PURA PROKTA MAYANGHA
JNANA YOG’ENA SANKHYANAAM KARMA YOG’ENA YOGINAAM.

In this world there is a two-fold path, O sinless Arjuna, the path of knowledge of the Sankhyans and the path of action of the Yogins.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

***   continuation from last week   ***

Jnana yog’ena sankhyanaam karma yog’ena yoginnaam :

a)   The path of Jnana by the men of knowledge and
b)   the path of action by the yogis (men of action.)

Yog’ena: yoga is the path that is taken to unite with the “Parabrahman” which is the same as “Liberation.”
Both the groups of people have to take a path that leads to Moksha.

We have two main tools given to us by the blessing of the Lord.
a)   The intellect;
b)   The mind with the sense organs and the organs of actions.

We will later on be told about King Janaka as an example of one who belonged to the second category of men.

Those who follow the path “a” are considered as following the path of “Nivritti”.
Others that follow the “b” path, are considered as following the path of “Pravritti.”

Both groups of people are fit to be called “sadhakas” and the steps taken by them are known as “sadhana.”
They are in search of “spiritual wealth” which is the meaning of the word “sadhana.”

The word “sankhya” is to be associated with “Jnana”. Jnana yogis are aware of the pitfalls by associating with the world of objects. The objects bring in a sense of “likes, dislikes” and many a time drag the seeker away from the spiritual path. They stick to their life of the study of the Vedas, Upanishads and sacred texts. The samyasins are those who renounce the world and show signs of renunciation. They wear ochre robes which is only an outward symbol of formal renunciation. (Let us make it clear now that wearing the ochre robe itself is not the sign of sanyasi.) The example we have are the four eternal youth, children of Lord Brahma. They are “Sanaka, Sananda, Sanatana and Sanatkumara.” They were asked by the creator Brahma to assist Him in the task of creation but refused to oblige. They are also known as “Antarmukhis”: men with the vision of the Atman within.

The other group are those who take the path of action to attain Liberation. They follow the principle of “karma” as enshrined in sloka 47, chapter 2. This group of people get the education in the ancient texts and then decide to get married. They take up the “Grihasta Ashrama Dharma.” They assist in sustenance of the universe by their actions. This group of men are considered as “Bahirmukhis”. They see and concentrate on the God around in various forms of life and respect the same.

These two are not separate paths and there is no need to enter into an argument as which is the best.

***   will be continued   ***

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

Find out more at www.GitaGlobal.com
Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/GitaGlobal or
Follow us on Posterous: http://gitaglobal.posterous.com

Posted via email from International Gita Foundation Trust

Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 3, Sloka 3, part 1

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.TheGita.org/Downloads/News_08_02.pdf   @@@

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Sloka 3

Sri Bhagawan uvacha:
Sri Bhagawan spoke thus:

LOKE’SMIN DVIVIDHA NISHTA PURA PROKTA MAYANGHA
JNANA YOG’ENA SANKHYANAAM KARMA YOG’ENA YOGINAAM.

In this world there is a two-fold path, O sinless Arjuna, the path of knowledge of the Sankhyans and the path of action of the Yogins.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Anagaha: Sinless.
Sri Krishna addresses Arjuna as “sinless.” Why?

Arjuna was a kshatriya and had killed many in the past and was going to kill many in the present war. Killing of people was not a sin for a kshatriya. It was the duty of the kshatriya to “protect.”

The soldiers fighting for a country are supposed to be fighting for the country and follow the orders from the seniors. The sin for a wrong war falls on the leaders who call for the war. The ordinary soldier is fulfilling his role in the society by carrying out the duties of fighting.

Arjuna, one of the top few men in the war and a Pandava, younger brother of Yudhistira, was a righteous man and pure by nature. He decided to fight Duryodhana who was wicked.

“Sinless” refers to the mental purity of Arjuna.

Lok’esmin:
“In this world”:

“Loka” in this context refers to the variety of people in the world around. Every individual is conducting “actions” as part and parcel of his daily life. We all have been blessed with the power of reasoning capacity. The sloka refers to those who conduct actions using the intellectual capacity of reasoning.

Dvividha nishta:
“Two fold path”:

Sri Krishna refers to two broad categories of people who conduct actions. We should look upon actions here representing actions for attainment of “Liberation.”

In an ordinary sense, actions could fall under a number of categories. Here, we are expected to look at only such actions that fulfil the duties of birth in this world as humans.

Pura prokta:
“Has been said so in the past”:

By making this statement, Sri Krishna is referring to the ancient scholars and wise men who gave advice to mankind towards ways of achieving Liberation. Please note that the word “I said so” did not come from the lips of the Lord. We can say that He is hinting at His Eternal state.

This statement held good in the past, correct at the time of the war and would be true in the future millenniums to come.

***   will be continued   ***

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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