Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 2, Sloka 71

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

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Sloka 71

VIHAAYA KAMAAN YAHA SARVAAN PUMAMS CHARATI NISPRUHAHA
NIRMAMO NIRAHANKARAHA SA SHANTIM ADIGACCHATI

That man who, abandoning all desires, lives without longing for them, without the sense of “I” and “mine”, attains “Peace.”

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The Lord has given three conditions to be fulfilled for the seeker who is longing for “Peace.” They are:
a) Abandoning of all desires.
b) No longing for the desires.
c) Dropping the sense of “I” and “Mine”.

Abandoning all desires means:
Freeing from the compulsions of desires from past experiences in life and no craving for the new impulses that enter into the mind through the sense organs.

The true goal for the spiritual seeker is “Peace”, the “Eternal Peace”, while living in this world of objects. So far, from the 55th sloka in this chapter, the Lord has enumerated the qualities of the “Sthitaprajna”, the man of steady wisdom.

How to recognise a “Sthitaprajna” was the question by Arjuna.

The reply through these slokas is:
The Sthitaprajna does not have a name plate in front of his house with the board: “Sthitaprajna’s house.”
He lives in constant peace within himself and still is an active member of the society. He has reached such a state of mental maturity wherein he has transcended the desire for “Peace.” He has realised that the peace is within himself in abundance.

When we say that the true goal for the seeker is “Peace”, we must accept that the initial steps have to be taken with a purpose of attaining the peace. There should be a desire for the same.

To experience the peace, the seeker has to get up from the state of tamas and move up to rajas. He should have a yearning to be successful in his quest to find peace. This can be compared to the earlier part of one’s education. We start of with a definite motive to take up the study in any selected field.

By making a successful progress, we reach the stage of higher studies. It is like entering from “Ph.D.” to “Post Doctorate” level of study. Only a successful student who has reached that stage will understand the meaning of “no further desire to get the Post Doctorate degree.” He will be working in his lab like an absent-minded professor, deeply immersed and happy with this work in the laboratory.

When the Lord says, abandoning all desires, living without longing for them, without the sense of “I” and “mine”, the advice is directed to such sincere seekers who have reached the level of entry into the Post Doctorate Fellowship.

This is in truest sense, “sanyasa” of all the desires. Hence this sloka is considered by the experts as the summary of “Sanyasa Yoga” in this second chapter. This chapter, Samkhya Yoga has summary of all the four main paths of yogas: Karma, Jnana, Bhakti and Dhyana.
Dhyana yoga is also known as Sanyasa yoga.

In our day to day experience, when we are in deep sleep there is no trace of ego left. We do not have any more “I” and “mine” sense only in that state. We are dead to the world of objects. We are so peaceful in deep sleep without any trace of happiness or sorrow.

The seeker who would like to experience and live in this state of “eternal peace” has to be constantly asleep to the experiences of the phenomenal world brought in by the senses and stored in the mind.

Only by dropping the longing for the desire to attain peace, the seeker will reach the state of “sthitaprajna.” He is truly the man with true wisdom. He is a real jnani. He has no sense of agency and ownership to the objects of the world including his own physical body.

Another important point to note in this sloka: the Lord does not put any condition of caste, sex, religion or creed to experience the ”Peace.” “Peace” is not the birth right of any one individual or any one group of individuals. It is the universal right for every individual who is born into this world and everyone has a right to long for it and work to attain it.

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 2, Sloka 66, part 3

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

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Sloka 66

NAASTI BUDDHIR AYUKTASYA NA CHAYUKTASYA BHAVANA
NA CHABHAVAYATAHA SHANTIR ASHANTASYA KUTAHA SUKHAM

To the unsteady mind there is no knowledge of the Self. To the unsteady mind there is no meditation. To the unmeditative no peace and to the man without peace, how can there be happiness?

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***   Sequel to part 2   ***

Meditating on the “Atman within” gives “Positive Peace.” It is everlasting peace.
Hence the last quarter of this sloka: “to the unmeditative no peace, and to the man without peace, how can there be happiness?”

Another interpretation to: “To the unsteady mind there no knowledge of the Self.”

The mind will be unsteady in he who has a number of desires. Due to contact with the physical world, it is but natural to get more and more desires. These in turn bring in more desires. We have already discussed the problems about desires.

If the same mind is directed towards the Atman within the unsteady boat can be steadied easily. There is less room for disturbing the mind when the object of desire is only one and remains the same constantly.

Those who have fulfilled the desires of the past and wiped off the vasana imprints and do not allow new imprints to be formed in their minds are known as: ”Aptakamahas.”

The state of perfection will be seen in that sadhaka where there shall be not be a cause or suffering either to others or to himself either in the outer world or inner world. This state can be achieved only on annihilation totally of ignorance. This is a blessing from the Lord when one truly and sincerely requests Him for “Jnana Prasada.”

It is no use simply to talk of “Peace” and pray for “Peace”. It has to be implemented with actions to bring in peace.

Such a positive Peace is to be seen in the “sthitaprajna.” (man of steady wisdom – see sloka 55, week 10, et sqq.) As he has dropped his ego and succeeded in merging the mind with the Atman through the process of steady contemplation, his constant companions will be “Peace and Happiness.”

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 2, Sloka 67

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

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Sloka 67

INDRIYANNAM HI CHARATAAM YANMANONU VIDHEEYATE
TADASYA HARATI PRAJNAAM VAYUR NAVAM IVAMMBHASI

For, the mind that follows the wandering senses, carries away the discrimination, just as the wind carries away a boat on the waters.

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The boat: Life that carries us to the destination of our choice is compared to the boat. The destination referred to in the sloka is “Salvation.”

The wind: This refers to the gale force/turbulent impulses from the world around sometime or other in the passage of life.

A spiritual aspirant with a good control over the mind will be sailing along the seas smoothly.

When the senses send in impulses of choice or when the mind suddenly starts dwelling on the stored memories of the past, the calmness is disturbed. The influence of the results of past actions is responsible for the gale force that sets in. The control over the boat is proportionately reduced. The aspirant will continue to use the oar to navigate in the stormy weathers but the distraction will direct the boat in another direction.

The tug of war between the impulses and control of the mind can lead the aspirant away from the destination or the boat itself might sink. When it sinks the aspirant and anybody who is also carried on the boat will have to swim to the shore. Many a times death or serious injury befalls on such victim/victims.

The mind on one side is exposed to the outer world via the senses.
On the opposite side it has the intellect with the Soul within.

Directing constantly to within using the power of intellectual’s discrimination and controlling the senses firmly and steadily is the secret to success.

The periods of turbulence has to be looked upon as the “test” by the Lord. The master has to test his student not only during the final exams but like the present day education, test is on a “continuous assessment” basis and sudden on the spot tests without giving any notice.

Instead of feeling sorry for himself, the aspirant has to feel happy during periods of turbulence in his life. The fact that the Lord has not forgotten His devotee, the aspirant should be prepared to face the test and pass the test with merit. With total control over the mind during periods of struggle the sthitaprajna achieves success.

Govern your mind is the message from the Lord through this sloka.

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 2, Sloka 68

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

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Sloka 68

TASMADYASYA MAHABAHO NIGRUHEETANI SARVASHAHA
INDRIYANNENDRIYARTHEBHYAS TASYA PRAJNA PRATISHTITA

Therefore, O Arjuna, his knowledge is steady whose senses are completely restrained from the sense-objects.

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Let us note clearly that when the Lord says “restrain the senses”, we must know that the senses include both the five sense organs and the mind.

We are asked clearly “to restrain” the senses and not asked to close the senses and direct the thought towards the Atman within. The Lord has sent us into this world blessed with five working sense organs and the working mind. He is advising us to learn the art to control them, not partial control, but total control. The senses should not be made defunct. They should be in perfect working order constantly.

We have the “Antararjyothi”, the “Inner Light of Wisdom.” It is our duty to keep it constantly lit and at the same time steady. It should neither be switched off not its light be blocked. This is essential to be on the pathway to Liberation and to reach the destination safe and sound.

What is good to reach the destination is the lesson to learn for all. At the same time, what is evil and which prevents us from reaching the destination is also the lesson to learn. The attitude with which the senses are directed towards the sense objects is the deciding factor in achieving success or failure in our mission of life. To perceive an object with lust and covetousness is sin. To perceive the same object with adoration and beauty created by the Lord is virtue. To see the body of a person as an object for fulfilling the lustful desires is a sin and to see the same body as a temple of God is the virtue.

The success in our mission of life is achieved when we learn the art of sanctifying the five sense organs and the mind. Thus we can contact only divinity in the world around with our senses.

The Lord is reminding us repeatedly to be vigilant. Control the sense organs and the mind is His constant reminder to the spiritual seeker. These organs take us from preyas to sreyas. By directing towards the world of objects, we travel in the path to preyas. By directing to the world of divinity, we can travel in the path to sreyas.

Please learn the art of: What to see, how to see, why to see, is the instruction by the master. The word “Seeing” does not just mean “eyes” only but all the sense organs and the mind.

Going back to the scene of Gitopadesham, let the reins on the horses be in the hand of the charioteer, let the charioteer be the Lord and let Arjuna, the mind stand up and fight the evil and uphold the dharma.

Step one in the study by the student is to have the candle light lit within the room, see that the windows are open to let the air in, close the curtains to stop from getting distracted with the scenes outside and also not to let the air blow out the candle light within the room.

Step two is to see that all his books are at hand and to concentrate on the study.

By following this principle, he is in the right path of understanding the subject under study and mastering the same.

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 2, Sloka 66, part 2

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.TheGita.org/Downloads/News_07_29.pdf   @@@

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Sloka 66

NAASTI BUDDHIR AYUKTASYA NA CHAYUKTASYA BHAVANA
NA CHABHAVAYATAHA SHANTIR ASHANTASYA KUTAHA SUKHAM

To the unsteady mind there is no knowledge of the Self. To the unsteady mind there is no meditation. To the unmeditative no peace and to the man without peace, how can there be happiness?

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***   Sequel to part 1   ***

Meditating on the world of objects does not bless us with “Positive Peace”. The peace experienced is only momentary.

Even for success in the material life, to get the final end result of success, there has to be a long period of education both theoretical and practical. There also, the student has to learn to curb his desires brought in by the senses during the period of study. He needs a steady mind to get the knowledge in the specialty chosen.

To an unsteady mind, (for a student) there is no gain of knowledge towards the specialty of his choice.

Constantly meditating on the subject to study is pre-requisite for success. The mind can either be towards the world of senses or towards the subject. It cannot be in two places at any one time.

The same rule has to be applied towards the spiritual study for the seeker. His mind has to be in constant meditation towards the atman within which is a treasure house of “Ananda.”

To summarise the same:

Sadhana: effort in life towards fulfilling the objectives both short term and long term.
Long term objective: experience of everlasting happiness – “Peace”.
Positive Peace is a state of experience of everlasting peace.
To get the Peace need to gain the knowledge of the Atman.
To gain the knowledge of the Atman, need to meditate on the same.
Without meditation and determination, concentration is not possible.
Success in meditation is “Yuktaha”
Failure to concentrate is “Ayuktaha.”
Success is possible by developing “sadbhavana” on the Atman.
At the same time, should not dwell on happiness from the objects around.
Control of the wandering mind from multiple objects around to one single “Atman” is the only means.

***   will be continued further   ***

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 2, Sloka 66, part 1

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.TheGita.org/Downloads/News_07_28.pdf   @@@

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Sloka 66

NAASTI BUDDHIR AYUKTASYA NA CHAYUKTASYA BHAVANA
NA CHABHAVAYATAHA SHANTIR ASHANTASYA KUTAHA SUKHAM

To the unsteady mind there is no knowledge of the Self. To the unsteady mind there is no meditation. To the unmeditative no peace and to the man without peace, how can there be happiness?

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The Lord is teaching us the positive by bringing in the negatives.

When we say “Peace” many a times we do not really mean the “Peace” from the spiritual point of view. The word “Peace” is used many a times without actually knowing its true meaning.

Peace could be:
– Negative peace;
– Positive peace.

Negative peace:

After the passage of experience of deep sorrow which all of us go through in our lives, many a times there is a period when there are no more events that bring in new waves of sorrow. At the same time there are no events that mask the sorrow by bringing in happiness. We tend to say “I am peaceful now”. This is “negative peace.” Absence of sorrow is wrongly interpreted by many as “Peace.” The peace here is conditioned by sorrow.

For examples:
– The eerie peace after a major tragedy.
– The peace before the storm (like the volcanic eruption – appearance of peace outwardly but boiling up with disturbances within.)
– The scenario of cold war.

Tragedy: Deep grief followed by a period of no further tragedies – feeling that one is peaceful after the events of that tragedy – through contrast from sorrow, one experiences mental tranquility.

Positive peace:

It is the peace that emanates from within the soul of the seeker and has no bearing with preceding state of sorrow. The seeker may go through states of sorrow or states of happiness but is not perturbed by either. He is “at peace with himself” at all times.

###   will be continued   #

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
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Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 2, Sloka 65, second version

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.TheGita.org/Downloads/News_07_27.pdf   @@@

As a support to the concerts and meditation today on behalf of the wellbeing of Mother Earth we start with a short prayer today:

JAYA GURU DATTA
OM SRI KRISHNAYA NAMAHA
OM SRI GITA MATAAYA NAMAHA
OM SRI GURUBHYO NAMAHA

OM SHANTIHI SHANTIHI SHANTIHI

Salutations to Datta Guru.
Salutations to Lord Krishna, Mother Gita.
Salutations to all the gurus.

Peace, Peace, Peace.
Peace from bodily obstacles like laziness, inertia.
Peace from phenomenal cruelties of nature.
Peace from heavenly wraths.

—–

Reminder:

On August 18th/19th there will be the 5. International Gita Conference taking place in the UK. Now a flyer with the final program is available at:

http://www.TheGita.org/Downloads/Flyer_Gita_Conference.pdf

You´re still very welcome to join in that event.

—–

Comment on this current newsletter:

In the book “Tat Tvam Asi” by Dr. Nath he gives an interpretation of sloka 65 which looks at it from a slightly different angle compared to what we have read the last two weeks. As personally I also like it very much, I add that one here before we go on with sloka 66 next week. (In the start up phase of this newsletter Dr. Nath AND the publisher of the book kindly agreed that I may use passages from the book – so you will see more of this in the future – which hopefully will also be appreciated by all the readers.)

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Sloka 65

PRASADE SARVA DUKHANAAM HANIRASYOPA JAYATE
PRASANNA CHETASO HYASHU BUDDIHI PARYAVATISHTATE

When a man attains peace, all pains caused by an unbalanced mind come to an end. By peace and purity the mind is soon fixed in the Atman.

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Peace is attained by control of all sense-organs constantly and by constant meditation on the Self. This gives the mind purity. In course of time, such a mind dissolves in the Atman and that is called liberation.

The first half of the verse says that equanimity in pain and sorrow makes one peaceful. Happiness is peace. Peace is happiness. This peace of mind is also termed prasada because it is the grace of God.

All the turbulent rivers lose their turbulence when they merge into the ocean. Similarly, a man who can control the agitations caused by the sense-organs and the mind (by absorbing himself in the contemplation of the Atman) will attain peace. He is said to have merged himself in the ocean of bliss.

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 2, Sloka 65, part 2

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.TheGita.org/Downloads/News_07_26.pdf   (full text for this sloka)   @@@

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Sloka 65

PRASADE SARVA DUKHANAAM HANIRASYOPA JAYATE
PRASANNA CHETASO HYASHU BUDDIHI PARYAVATISHTATE

In tranquillity, all the sorrow is destroyed. For, the intellect of the tranquil minded is soon anchored in equilibrium.

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***   continued from last week   ***

By directing the mind to the intellect, by letting the mind be subservient to the intellect, by the intellect keeping in constant contact with the “Light within of the Atman”, no sorrows will hinder the spiritual progress of the aspirant.

The aspirant will have an easy ride on his boat that carries him on the ocean of samsara and reach the shore at the other end. No wave is strong enough to disrupt the passage of the boat. The seeker will be calm and collected in all sorts of adverse weathers that affect his life as he is sure that his Lord will make him reach the destination. It is the “Prasada” by the Lord for the tranquil state of the seeker.

Such an aspirant is “Sthitaprajna.”

Let us ponder into the various types of sorrows that we experience in our lives and see what the sastras have to say about the same.

The sastras declare that all sorrows and sufferings could be traced to one of the following three sources. All the upanisads teach us to utter the mantra “Shanti” three times at the end of every prayer. They are the blessings we request the Lord to help us to overcome the problems that hinder us in our path to attain “Salvation.” They are:

a)      Adhyatmika
b)      Adhibhoutika
c)      Adhidaivika.

Adhyatmika: these are the problems arising subjectively in the sense like laziness, lack of faith, insincerity and other negative thoughts/actions.

Adhibhoutika: these are the problems arising from the phenomenal world. By this I mean, fires, floods, landslides etc. It is no exaggeration to say that these are man made. Some of them made over the centuries with utter disrespect to the nature.

Adhidaivika: these are problems we face by the wrath of the supreme power above about which we either are ignorant or do not care to know of. “Panchamaha bhootas” in their interaction can bring about problems like lightning and thunder that bring us sorrow.

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 2, Sloka 64

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.TheGita.org/Downloads/News_07_24.pdf   @@@

Sorry, I was traveling, therefore now a rather long text for the last and the present week together.

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Sloka 64

RAGA DWESHA VIYUKTAIS TU VISHAYAAN INDRIYAIS CARAN
ATMAVASAIR VIDHEYATMA PRASADAM ADHIGACHATI

But, the self-controlled man, free from attraction and repulsion, with his senses under restraint, though moving among objects, attains peace.

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Two words of note in this sloka are:
Vidheyatma and atma vashai.

Vidheyatma refers to the control over the mind, and
Atma vashai refers to the restraint over the senses.

“Moving among objects”: it refers to the result of association with life. Life is living and about association with people/objects. To live and sustain ourselves in this world we have to associate with the life around. It is all about either attraction or repulsion to the ones we get attached to. “Raga” is attachment and “dwesha” is hatred towards the individual/objects possessed.

The life will be peaceful for he, who does not experience either attraction or repulsion. The sloka is about the method of experiencing the “Peace” while living in this world. Such an individual is a “Sthitaprajna”.

How can one honestly have such a control?

We have to look at the life in the army. The army has different cadres from officers of highest rank to the foot soldiers. There is an order of living among these soldiers. There is peace abiding in the army camp. Members of every cadre carry on their duties and at the same time there is control over each cadre from the ones immediately higher rank. There is an orderly control over each cadre.

Our body has also the different cadres. We have:
The Atman.
The intellect.
The mind with “Kama, krodha, lobha, moha” in every individual.
The sense organs.

The life is understood when we compare it to the chariot.

The chariot is a means to take the rider from place “a” to “b”.
The horses run the chariot.
There is a need for charioteer to control and guide the horses.
The individual wishing to move from place “a to b” will be inside the chariot and will have to carry his tool of action.
The chariot has to pass through the busy life and take the individual to his destination.

Let us now get back to the individual:
Each one has to move from place “a to b” in our lives.
The learned elders say that the final place to reach is where there abides everlasting “Peace.”
All the stations in life before the final destination of “Peace” will have a mixture of happiness and sorrow.

The final destination of “Peace” is “Moksha”. (salvation)
The desire to reach the final destination should be “kama”;
Anger at what prevents us from reaching the destination should be “Krodha”;
Greed at wishing to attain salvation should be “Lobha”;
Delusion towards the beauty of the final destination should be “Moha.”

These are the four horses on our chariot of life.
The horses as we know can run riot. Kama, krodha, lobha and moha can run riot and destroy us if directed towards anything other than salvation.

The “reins” on the horses are to control the horses.
The sense organs are the reins in our body.
The intellect is the charioteer and
The mind is the individual on the chariot wishing to reach the destination.

In the army, the junior cadre of soldiers obey the senior cadre officers diligently. They are not allowed to run amuck. There will be no order in that camp where the rules of each cadre are not followed.

Similarly, our senses have to be under the control of the mind, the mind under the control of the intellect and the intellect under the control of antaratma.

The sloka refers to the control of the senses: “atma vashai”. Restraining the senses by the mind is implicit in this word.

The sloka also refers to control of the mind: “Vidheyatma”. The mind has to be obedient to the intellect is implicit in this word.

The self-controlled man free from attraction and repulsion:

The mind receives the impulses from the material world and keeps a store of what it likes and dislikes in its memory bank. It has the capacity to go into this bank and recollect those feelings. When it does so, it loses track of its progress to destination. By falling prey to either of these two feelings, it fails to experience the “Peace.”

Where the intellect comes into play and controls the mind from falling prey to the attractions and repulsions, the mind can carry its ordained duties and the seeker will finally experience the Peace.

The charioteer has to hold on to the reins and control the horses.
The individual has to hold on to his tool of action and carry on his duty.

The mind is the “individual” and
The intellect is the “charioteer.”

The word “Self control” used in this sloka refers to the control of the mind. The mind should be under the control of the intellect and not slave to the senses. The intellect has to say, “you do your duty and I will control the senses.”

We can also say “Be a master over yourself.” Without such self-mastery, Self-realisation is not possible. The Atman should be the guide for the seeker in his daily activities. This is the sure way to success.

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 2, Sloka 65, part 1

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.TheGita.org/Downloads/News_07_25.pdf   @@@

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Sloka 65

PRASADE SARVA DUKHANAAM HANIRASYOPA JAYATE
PRASANNA CHETASO HYASHU BUDDIHI PARYAVATISHTATE

In tranquillity, all the sorrow is destroyed. For, the intellect of the tranquil minded is soon anchored in equilibrium.

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Prasada in this context is to be understood as the tranquil state of the mind.

After all, as we know by now that the mind due to its association with the material world around comes to experience happiness and sorrow in various proportions depending upon the karmas of the past.

It is also true that in states of happiness we do not ponder on anything other than the happiness experienced. We are not worried. On the other hand we would like the experience to be ever lasting. But, alas, the experience of happiness from the material world can never be eternal. In course of time the happiness is followed by sorrow, it has “a birth, growth, decay and death.”

The sloka therefore takes us only to “Sarva dukhanaam”. (it does not say “sarva sukhanaam.”) It means “during all the sorrows.” It is only during times of sorrow that we ponder about why, what, why only me etc. Many a times we do not have an answer for the same. We might go to all available sources to get answers to our question and still we will not get any satisfaction.

Only in tranquillity all the sorrow is destroyed, the Lord says.
How?

“The intellect of the tranquil mind is soon anchored in equilibrium” is the Lord’s explanation.

The answer to the question “why” will be found by the reasoning capacity, the intellect. The intellect that is pure and in contact with the “antaratman” is able to have a firm control over the mind. The mind that works as subordinate to the intellect is content to be subservient to its immediate boss. It is happy to accept the sloka 38 in this chapter, “Sukha dukhe same’ kritva” (see week 40 in 2006). It is the meaning of the word “tranquil minded is soon anchored in equilibrium.”

Keeping the mind even under all circumstances is the only means to gain purity. The pure mind does not get troubled by the sorrows in life.

***   will be continued next week   ***

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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