Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 2, Sloka 47, part 2

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

+++   Seasons Greetings and best wishes for a blessed 2007 to all of you from Dasha and Dr. Nath   +++

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(including part 1 on sloka 47)

###  continuation from last week  ###

The word “adhikara” can be understood as “right of inheritance” also. Unless we are entitled to, we cannot inherit any property from our ancestors.

From our parents, we have inherited the “Divine Soul” with a physical body to conduct the actions as servants of the “Divine.”

Both the Soul and the physical body are precious inheritance and we must look after them carefully. After being born as “humans,” we have a duty to work “humanely.”

The result, the Lord says will come on their own accord. But they do depend upon how we conduct the duties. We must know the “job description” of any job we are selected for and work accordingly. Breaking the job description as we know results in expulsion from that job.

As we proceed further and understand the sacred text clearly, we will learn that the results of our actions have to be shared with family/friends/society and not just for personal gains and personal pleasures.

We do get wealth in one form or other from our actions. Students gets the wealth of education, (jnana) and the employees gets pay packet for their actions. We have to consider that the wealth we get from our actions and what we hold on to is only as “caretakers” of that wealth and not as the sole owners. The bank manager with responsibility of large sums of money works only as its caretaker. Using it for personal gains and pleasures is equal to having committed a crime and face the consequences of the same.

“Let not the fruits of action be your motive”:

We have to read it as “Nishkama karma”. There should be no desire for the results of the actions.

Of course it is a fact that each job has its set standard of pay/benefits. Having graduated and appointed as a teacher, the job comes with a pay packet at the end of each month. The pay packet should not be the motive for the job is what we must understand. Working with the thought on the reward at the end of the work automatically reduces the work efficiency. Single pointed concentration on day to day’s work will bring in the maximum result in any job undertaken.

The society we are in now has deteriorated so fast that we have started to live not with the money earned yesterday but using the money we hope to get tomorrow. It is the era of “plastic cards, credit cards.” We enter into the trap of “Debt” by borrowing the tomorrow’s money for today.

“I am going to be the “Prime Minister” and I am going to enjoy the benefits of the office ” should not be the attitude to work. On the other hand, it should be: “I am going to be the servant of the public and work for the welfare of the society.”

Each days work has to be given its importance and the work fulfilled to one’s maximum potential. The pay packet will come on its own accord at the end of the month. Working with the monetary benefit in mind will dilute the efficiency of the work. If the work is not satisfactory, there is a possibility of loosing the job also.

Single pointed dedicated work becomes “Divine work.” This is “dhyana” in its true sense.

“Nor let your attachment be to inaction”:

There may be some, who by not understanding the sloka properly come to think that actions lead automatically to attachment. No one can live without work even for a second. To give up work is a sign of laziness and it becomes “Tamasic.” The parents have parental duty towards their children and cannot escape from the same.

Spiritual seeker must know that he has to burn the existing vasanas. By not burning the inherited vasanas, he will not make any progress.

Arjuna wanted to escape from the war, go to the forest, become a sanyasi. He did not want to face the terrible consequences of war. Sri Krishna is categorically warning him not to do so.

For a short while Arjuna might find peace in the forest but soon would get involved in the life of forest and his kshatriya tendencies will manifest again.

###  to be continued week after next, following a short break for the festive season  ###

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 2, Sloka 47, part 1

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

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Sloka 47

KARAMANYAVADHIKARASTHE MAA PHALESHU KADACHANA
MAA KARMA PHALA HETUR BHURMA TE SANAGOSTVAKARMANI

You have the right to work only
but never to its fruits.
Let not the fruits of action be your motive.
Nor let your attachment be to inaction.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

This sloka has to be divided into four quarters to understand it fully and is one of the most important as it summarises the entire philosophy of “karma.” It demands that the seeker develops the knowledge of “right action.” Jnana and Karma have to mingle and together they take the seeker to higher planes of spiritual enlightenment.

a) Karmanye vadhikaraste:  you have a right to work only
b) Maa phaleshu kadachana:  no right for the fruits thereof.
c) Maa karma phla-heturbhuh:  let not the fruits be your motive.
d) Maa te sangostv akarmani:  let not be attached to inaction.

“Adhikara” is the most important word in this sloka and we must understand it clearly. It means “right”, “entitlement.”

The student who has gained entry into a school, paid the fees is entitled to enter the school and attend the prescribed classes. He has “adhikara” to be in the school during the classes.

The consultant at a particular hospital, selected by the panel, gets the right to enter the premises and work in the appropriate ward.

The M.P having won the confidence of the electorate has a right to enter the House of Parliament. He has the “adhikara” to do so.

On this basis, due to our past karmas, the Lord has given us the “Adhikara” to live as “humans” on this earth.

Each one of us, by His blessings, as a result of actions performed both in the past births and in this life, have attained a certain position in family/society we live in.

Like a director of a film/play, we have been given different roles to play.

“You have a right to work only” and “no rights for the fruits thereof” has to be understood in this context. We have to work according to the rules of the position we are given. Our sastras call it as “Ashrama dharma”. A child has to follow the rules of childhood and the student has to follow the rules of education. We have a duty to fulfil that role.

What we get from our work, as we will understand when we proceed to the other chapters is to share with family/society.

Life starts from being in debt from childhood itself.

We are in debt to our parents for the love and affection they put in our upbringing and for the sacrifices they undergo.

To the society who provide the basic needs like education, medical care, water supply, electricity etc during the period of education from kindergarten to university. (Our parents fee towards the education is a paltry sum in relation to the contribution by the society.)

When we understand this way, we realise that the pay packet we receive should include repayment to the society for the debts incurred. If we work out how much it costs the society to give full education to a child, the young adult from the time of graduation has to work without pay for the rest of his/her life.

So, what we really get from our work as pay/fee cannot be called as “my money”.

The second quarter of the sloka “no rights for the fruits thereof” has to be understood on this basis.

The word “adhikara” can be understood as “right of inheritance” also. Unless we are entitled to, we cannot inherit any property from our ancestors.

###  more on this follows next week   ###

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 2, Sloka 46

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

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Sloka 46

YAAVAAANARTHA UDAPANE SARVATAHA SAMPLUTODAKE
TAAVAAN SARVESHU VEDESHU BRAHMANASYA VIJAANATHAHA

To an enlightened person, who has known the Self, all the Vedas are as useful as a reservoir of water in a place where there is a flood.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

What is the role of reservoir of water in any town?

The reservoir is meant to store the water and make it simpler to provide water to the needy.

During times of drought and similar situations the water in the reservoir can be directed to the place of the needy.

If there is flood, water is to be seen everywhere. (Let us not get into the argument of health hazards and other problems at this stage. This is only an example and no example can give us a true picture of the Supreme. )

The enlightened person is compared to the place that is flooded. His mind is flooded with the name, form, qualities of the Divine. With faith, bhakti he has understood the Supreme. For he, who has understood the Supreme, the Vedas are of no further use. As the Vedas are for understanding the Supreme, the enlightened person need not have to go to classes for understanding the Vedas. There is no need for him to take up the rituals in karma kanda. After all, the karma kanda rituals are for experiencing the heavenly pleasures.

For a post graduate fellow who has mastered the knowledge there is no need to go back to the university to acquire further knowledge.

Indirectly the message for us all from the Lord is, “Get enlightened, carry on doing your duty. Do not go for worldly pleasures and do not strive for heaven.”

Another important word to note is “vijanataha”. “Janataha” means “who knows.” “Vijanataha” means “who knows very well.” It is not enough to know the subject well but it is important to know it fully well and understand completely.

This is the prelude for the most important sloka in the sacred text: “Karmanye vadhikarasthe.”

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
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Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 2, Sloka 45

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

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Sloka 45

TRAIGUNYA VISHAYAA VEDA NISTRAIGUNYO BHAVAARJUNA
NIRDVANDO NITYA SATVASTO NIRYOGA KSHEMA ATMAVAAN

The Vedas deal with three gunas O Arjuna. Transcend the three gunas, become free from the pairs of opposites. Remain ever in pure satvika state and be firmly established in Atman.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Sri Krishna has brought in the subject of “Gunas.” Arjuna was already familiar with the word “Gunas”.

Let us briefly analyse the meaning of this important word.

We will have more opportunity to learn about it as we proceed further. Chapter 14 is dedicated totally to the subject of “Gunas.”

“Guna” means “Quality.” “Quality” is the outward expression of our inherent nature.

This is influenced by the reaction to the impulses brought in by the five sense organs to the mind, the reaction by the mind to such impulses received and the amount of influence the intellect has on the mind. It is not just the impulses received at present but to the impulses received from the past.

The gunas are three in number:

Satvic  –  pure
Rajasic  –  passionate
Tamasic  –  lazy, indolent.

Sri Krishna advises Arjuna to transcend the three gunas. Why?

Tamasic guna which is “laziness and indolence” does not assist in the upward progress for the spiritual seeker. On the other hand, it is the cause of downfall of the seeker to lower levels of existence.

Rajasic guna brings in the thirst for more desires. Desires in turn lead to many more actions, subsequent reactions and the cycle goes on and on. This is the cause for innumerable births into this world. Depending upon the quality of desires, the birth could be into one of the many different forms of life.

Satvic guna even though pure in nature, has the pitfall of making the seeker feel that he is a pure soul and as a consequence develop the feeling that “I am superior to others.” It brings in “ego” which is the cause for rapid and great fall from spiritual heights achieved.

Arjuna had climbed up from tamasic to the rajasic level. Arjuna by birth was a kshatriya and a man of action. His pure nature by association with revered elders in the family like Bheeshma and with Krishna had lifted him to higher levels of rajas. The next step for him was to lift himself up to satvic level of purity.

As a true guru Krishna wanted his sincere disciple not to develop the ego of being “satvic”. Hence, his advice “Transcend the three gunas.”

“Remain ever pure in Satvika and be established in Atman” is the advice. This state, the learned elders say is “Suddha Satva.”

“Suddha Satva” is total purity of thoughts. The spiritual seeker having overcome reacting to pairs of opposites like happiness and sorrow; pains and pleasure gets firmly established in the “Atman.”

This state is the same as “Sthitaprajna” which means “Man of steady wisdom.” We are going to get an elaborate description of the qualities of “Sthitaprajna” towards the end of this chapter.

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 4, sloka 39, part 1

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

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Sloka 39

SRADDHAAVAAN LABHATE JNANAM TATPARAHA SAMYATENDRIYAHA
JNANAM LABDHVAA PARAAM SHANTIM ACHIRENA ADHIGACHATI

The man of faith having knowledge as his supreme goal, the devoted, having controlled the senses, obtains knowledge of Atma, and having obtained that, enjoys peace for ever.

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Sraddhaavaan: the man of faith.
Tatparaha: devoted; having the knowledge as the supreme goal.
Samyatendriyaha: subdued the senses.

The above three are the conditions to be met to get the knowledge in any field of activity, either spiritual or worldly. Stronger the determination to acquire the knowledge, greater is the need to fulfil the above three conditions.

The student who has reached the stage of secondary education and who would like to make substantial progress in the studies has to develop devotion to the subject of his choice and not let the wandering mind get distracted. As he receives the dividends for his efforts, he develops more faith in continuing his plan of action for making further progress in the studies. With total devotion, faith and self-control, he will achieve the knowledge he strived for and come out with distinction. With this success, he can enjoy the next stage of life because he would be competent and eligible to take the professional duties of his choice and get financial reward for the work conducted. The security of the wealth obtained from the knowledge acquired should give immense joy in becoming a professional.

We can take the same principle in the study of the spiritual science.
Why do we have to undertake such study and austerities?
We should do so to get the knowledge of the Atman that gives the “Bliss”.
Spiritual studies and spiritual practice are the means to get “The Bliss.” The spiritual seeker is he who is after the knowledge that gives him the eternal peace. He has realised that every action has a result and that result is either happiness or sorrow. The life has taught him the lesson that both the states of happiness and sorrow are temporary and one experience eventually merges into the other. He is on the lookout for that experience which is beyond both sorrow and happiness. The sastras designate this state as “Moksha” which is nothing but “Eternal Peace” (param shantim). It is a process of climbing up the spiritual ladder, the steps of the ladder being the results of life’s experiences.
***  will be continued  ***

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK. Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“. Find out more at www.GitaGlobal.com Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/GitaGlobal or Follow us on Posterous: http://gitaglobal.posterous.com

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Bhagavad Gita – Gita Jayanti

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

Bhagavad Gita – Gita Jayanti

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Jaya Guru Datta.

This year the auspicious day of Gita Jayanti falls on Friday the 1st of December.
Here is a message of Dr. Nath concerning that day.

Gita Jayanti is the day to celebrate the birth of the sacred text Srimad Bhagawadgita.

Just more than 5000yrs ago, Lord Krishna first gave it to Arjuna in the battlefield of Kurukshetra. Sage poet Veda Vyasa gifted it to the mankind.

It was for the sole purpose of expelling the darkness called “Ignorance” which in turn leads one to “Vishada” (despondency) on facing the different aspects of life that bring in grief.

We are all born into this world as a consequence of actions in the past, some good and some bad, we therefore have to experience proportionate happiness or sorrow in relation to the acts conducted knowingly or unknowingly in the past. We do experience these either now or in the future. There is no exception to this rule.

This applies to majority of us. Some great blessed souls are exceptions to this rule.

Having been born as humans we have a duty to act humanely. If we do not want to experience the sorrows in future, our actions have to be improved now and we have to sow the seeds for good actions for tomorrow too.

The sacred text gives us through the 18 chapters, 701 slokas the means to improve our quality of thoughts.

We should become good farmers, know the seeds we need to sow in our minds and in the minds of our children, know how to look after the tender sprouts that shoot forth, learn the art of deweeding the mind of bad thoughts. All the time keeping in mind that the welfare of the Lord’s creation is the duty for each one of us who consider themselves as servants of the Lord to carry out His will.

Each one is potentially divine but the divinity is hidden because of Maya and its play.

Many great souls across the country do celebrate this day as 1, 2, 3 or 7 days of discussion on the Gita and call it as “Gita Jnana Yajna.”

Let us individually or in groups of satsang do conduct the Gita Yajna with sradha, bhakti and receive the blessings of Lord Krishna, Gita Maata and Datta guru.

Dr Nath

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
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Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 2, Slokas 42-44, part 3

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.thegita.org/Downloads/News_06_46.pdf    @@@
(including part 1 and part 2 on slokas 42-44)

###  continuation from last week  ###

Let us now look at the three slokas in question.

“The unwise utter flowery speech.”

The wise are those who go for knowledge and learn practically from the knowledge acquired and become wise. Unwise are those who go for knowledge but do not learn from the lessons in life.

This sloka refers to those who take up the spiritual path and start to learn the Vedas. They do not proceed beyond the “Karma kanda”. They are tempted by the heavenly pleasures that come by conducting the various rituals and do not proceed to the next section of “Upasana.” They boast about the Vedic knowledge acquired. This is what is meant by “the unwise utter flowery speech.”

“They take pleasure in eulogising words of the Vedas.”

It means that they take pleasures in talking about the benefit of the various rituals mentioned in the Karma kanda.

“They say that there is nothing but pleasures.”

It refers to the heavenly pleasures that are for the taking for those who conduct the rituals as described in Karma kanda.

“They are full of desires—–.”

They conduct the rituals wishing for the desired results from the conduct of such rituals. As a consequence they exhaust the merits of good work conducted and fall into the cycle of births and deaths.

“The minds of such men are drawn away by attachments to pleasure and wealth—.”

They concentrate on the beneficial and pleasurable results of the good work conducted. They go for such higher and higher pleasures but stop short of final pleasure of “Moksha.”

They cannot conduct Upasana on the “Eternal Truth.” Their minds cannot remain steady on the contemplation of the “Eternal Truth”.

Desires distract the mind and we should not go after desires is the Lord’s message for the spiritual seekers.

“Vyavasayatmika buddhi samadhou na vidheeyate” (sloka 44):

Refer to sloka 41 for the explanation on “Vyavasayatmika buddhi.”

“Samadhi” is total single pointed contemplation on the “Supreme” and cutting away totally from worldly distractions. Those who go after the pleasures cannot fix their mind on the Supreme and cannot attain “Samadhi.”

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 2, Slokas 42-44, part 2

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.thegita.org/Downloads/News_06_45.pdf    @@@
(including part 1 slokas 42-44)

###  amendment to last week  ##

Sloka 42 as translated last week:

O Arjuna, the unwise utter flowery speech. They take pleasure in the eulogising words of the Vedas (annotation by Dasha: Sri Swamiji translates: “Vedic words which glorify earthly and heavenly enjoyments”) and say, “There is nothing else but pleasures.”

Amendment by Dr. Nath:

I have used the word “eulogising” to mean –
“express words of praise for the sake of praising only – not having totally understood the true meaning”.

###  continuation from last week  ###

If we compare this three-tier system of Vedic education to our present day education system, we can understand the implications more clearly.

Before the education, one is considered as “ignorant.” The ignorant lives in darkness. He/she is lazy and/or not interested in acquiring knowledge. (tamasic living)

We, the elders in the society have to tempt (bribe) the young kids who are keen to spend their time on playing and enjoying themselves to accept the need for education. To do so, we have to tempt them with rewards like sweets, gifts etc for showing progress in learning. With the progress in education, the need for giving rewards for success has to get less and less. Instead of rewards as the motive for good work, maturity should bring in the attitude that the knowledge acquired for welfare is the reward for hard work.

The Karma Kanda section of the Vedas deals with various rituals and the benefits one can get by performing them. They offer the promise of “heavenly pleasures” for those who conduct the rituals. This is like inducement to show interest in learning the Vedas.

The Upasana Kanda takes the spiritual seeker a step higher and gets him/her to concentrate more on the end result of acquiring the total knowledge that leads to the path of “Moksha”.

Finally, the “Jnana Kanda” that takes the seeker away from worldly pleasures and gives the end result of “Moksha.”

It is important to remember that the Vedic education is to dissuade the seeker from running after the personal pleasures and to live the life of “Peace and Contentment.”

They say that “heaven” is an intermediary plane of experiencing higher forms of pleasures. They also teach that the pleasures experienced in heaven are not permanent and are directly proportional to the amount of spiritual effort put in.

It is like spending the money saved by hard work to relax and go for holidays. As soon as the savings are exhausted, we cannot remain in the resort we enjoyed previously and have to start working and saving for next period of holidays.

Heaven is to be looked upon as a place of reward for good deeds done on earth. The one who is looking for pleasures in life, albeit, in an honest way, will experience the heavenly pleasures in relation to the good deeds conducted. As soon as the benefits proportionate to the good deeds are exhausted, he/she has to work again to acquire more spiritual points.

The highest goal for man is to know and realise the Eternal truth. Every benefit that he/she gets for the efforts which comes short of the final end result is of no consequence. Heaven is not the goal. Those who go after the pleasures of heaven will unfortunately fall down to earth on exhausting good spiritual points acquired by hard work. They have to go through many more cycles of births and deaths before reaching the final goal. This is what the texts say as “samsara.”

###  to be continued next week  ###

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 2, Slokas 42-44, part 1

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.thegita.org/Downloads/News_06_44.pdf   @@@

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Slokas 42 – 44

YAMIMAAM PUSHPITAAM VAACHAM PRAVADNATY AVIPASCHITAHA
VEDA VAADA RATAAHA PARTHA NANYAD ASTITI VADINAHA

O Arjuna, the unwise utter flowery speech. They take pleasure in the eulogising words of the Vedas and say, “There is nothing else but pleasures.”

KAMATMAANAHA SVARGAPARAHA JANMA KARMA PHALA PRADAAM
KRIYA VISHSHA BAHULAAM BHOGAISHWARYA GATIM PRATI

They are full of desires, their highest goal is heaven, leading to new birth as reward for their actions, and engage themselves in specific works for the purpose of acquiring enjoyments and prosperity.

BHOGAISHWARYA PRASAKTANAAM TAYAPA HRITA CHEATASAAM
VYAVASAYATMIKA BUDDHIHI SAMADHOU NA VIDHEEYATE

The minds of such men who are drawn away by attachment to pleasures and wealth cannot be concentrated to remain fixed in divine contemplation and samadhi.

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We need to take the three slokas together to understand the true import of the words used by the Lord.

To understand clearly the true meaning of the slokas, we should recollect some basic principles of spiritual education.

The subject matter of the ancient method of spiritual teaching was “The Vedas.”
The learning of the Vedas was to assist the spiritual seeker in “realising the Eternal Truth which is nothing but the Eternal Happiness abiding within each one of us.”

The Vedas, as we have discussed in the beginning are broadly divided into three sections. They are:
Karma Kanda
Upasana Kanda.
Jnana Kanda

Karma Kanda deals with various rituals and gives the benefits from conduct of such rituals.

Upasana Kanda deals with methods of Sadhana that assist in concentrating on the “Supreme” and controlling the mind from getting distracted to worldly pleasures.

Jnana Kanda is the final section that deals with acquiring the wisdom about the Supreme, dropping the feeling of “me and mine” and uniting back with the Supreme. It is realising the “Tat Tvam Asi” which is popularly known as “Moksha.”

###  to be continued next week  ###

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 2, Sloka 41

Newsletter on Bhagavadgita by Dr. P.V. Nath

@@@   http://www.thegita.org/Downloads/News_06_43.pdf    @@@

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Sloka 41

Vyavasayatmika buddhir ekeha kurunandana
Bahu shaka hy anantasca buddhaya vyavasayinam.

O Arjuna, there is only one faith and thought for those who practice this Karma yoga. The minds of others are divided into various branches and their thoughts are endless.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The important word to understand in this sloka is:
Vyavasaya.

One of the meanings for this word is “Agriculture.”
The farmer is an agriculturist and he works with single pointed concentration to get the maximum yield for his effort. Let us analyse his work briefly.

Farmer deals with seeds, the seeds for good crops. To get the best results he conducts the following tasks:
Selects the seed that is suitable to sow in the land.
Tills the land and makes it ready to sow the seeds.
Learns about the time to sow the seeds and the preparation of the land for the same.
Knows about the average weather pattern for different seasons.
Takes steps to protect the tender shoots in the earlier days from adverse weather conditions.
Clears all the weeds that grow and also takes precautions from other animals that might ruin the crop at any stage of the development.

With all these efforts and with God’s grace he gets the yield which feeds him and becomes a source of his income.

To get the final result of getting a good income, he has to wait a long time from the time he sows the seeds.
At any one time his thoughts will be on to do during that period and not live day dreaming for the final results.

The knowledge of what to do at each period of the growth, conducting such acts that are needed at that time, hard dedicated work from morning till evening each day of the week will contribute to the final successful yield of the crops. Of course, he is aware of the adverse weather condition he might have to face and prays the Lord to prevent such calamities.

This is true “Karma yoga” put into practice.

This is the faith and thoughts for those who practice karma yoga as enumerated in this sloka.

The sacred text is all about the sowing of the good seeds of thoughts in the human mind. The human mind is to be compared to the land into which the seeds of thoughts are to be sown.

The parents have a duty to get the minds of their children ready (“till” the land) for sowing the seeds of thoughts.

Early education into good conduct with examples from ancient mythological stories should give children the knowledge of sowing the seeds of good thoughts. Carefully guarding the land (mind), the seeds (thoughts maturing to become actions), removal of weeds (impure thoughts) with faith and dedication will guarantee the yield of good citizens of the land that herald peace and prosperity for the region.

This is the “Karma Yoga” or yoga of action which the Lord is referring to. Majority of us unfortunately do not fit into this category as our minds are filled with endless thoughts of desires and hatreds.

Copyright for the texts on Bhagavad Gita by Dr. P.V. Nath, UK.
Questions concerning the text please direct to Dr. Nath at “snath@btinternet.com“.

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Posted via email from International Gita Foundation Trust